Managing the adverse effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

Vitamin K 1  is available for intravenous (IV), subcutaneous, and oral administration. Table 1 provides a brief summary of the advantages and disadvantages for each route of Vitamin K 1 . The subcutaneous route has a delayed onset and is less predictable. 1  If rapid reversal is desired, the IV route should be utilized, as this route is associated with the fastest onset of action. Historically, intravenous vitamin K 1  has been associated with an increased risk of anaphylaxis. A retrospective review of anaphylactic reactions associated with IV vitamin K 1  from the Mayo Clinic revealed that the risk of anaphylaxis with vitamin K 1  was 3 per 10,000 doses—a rate comparable to all forms of penicillin and less than that of IV iron dextran. 4  If is administered by the IV route, lower doses and slower infusion rates are recommended. Unless rapid reversal of the INR is critical, oral vitamin K 1  is the preferred route of administration. In the United States, oral vitamin K 1  is only available as a 5 mg tablet (Mephyton ® ). Therefore, oral doses prescribed should reflect even divisions of 5 mg (., mg).

Managing the adverse effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

managing the adverse effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

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