Inhaled corticosteroids for asthma mechanism of action

To reduce swelling and tightness in their airways, some children with asthma are treated for months or years with an oral corticosteroid, such as prednisone. Others may be treated with a short “burst” of an oral corticosteroid for five to seven days. A burst is prescribed in an emergency situation when asthma severity markedly intensifies. While corticosteroids are known to suppress immune function, children receiving oral corticosteroid treatment rarely have complications from chickenpox.

There is no evidence that an inhaled corticosteroid poses an increased risk for children with asthma who are exposed to chickenpox. Inhaled corticosteroids are used for long-term relief of symptoms and reduce the need for extra medicine, such as oral steroids.

Use of QVAR with a spacer device in children less than 5 years of age is not recommended. In vitro dose characterization studies were performed with QVAR 40 mcg/actuation with the OptiChamber and AeroChamber Plus ® spacer utilizing inspiratory flows representative of children under 5 years old. These studies indicated that the amount of medication delivered through the spacing device decreased rapidly with increasing wait times of 5 to 10 seconds as shown in Table 2. If QVAR is used with a spacer device, it is important to inhale immediately.

Inhaled corticosteroids for asthma mechanism of action

inhaled corticosteroids for asthma mechanism of action

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